Seneca Hill Animal Hospital, Resort & Spa Joins Community Veterinary Partners

PHILADELPHIA (Nov. 20, 2018)Community Veterinary Partners (CVP) is happy to announce Seneca Hill Animal Hospital, Resort & Spa in Great Falls, Va., has joined the CVP family. Seneca Hill’s 27,000-square-foot facility is CVP’s second-largest animal hospital and the 55th hospital acquired by the company to date.

 

“Seneca Hill is an exciting addition to our network of hospitals in the D.C. area,” said Kevin Ruffe, CEO at CVP. “The commitment of Dr. Homan and her team to providing high-quality and compassionate care aligns well with CVP’s mission and makes them an ideal fit to join our growing network.”

 

Led by Dr. Janice Homan, Seneca Hill is an AAHA-accredited animal hospital that has grown from a small 1,200-square-foot farm house in 1981 to an expansive 27,000-square-foot state-of-the-art facility that opened in 2014. Drs. Randy Custer, Katherine Newland, Jarrod Ludwig, Annie Welsh and Susan Sacks round off the veterinary team that holds the highest rating from Washington Consumers’ Checkbook.

 

“What Dr. Homan and her team have built at Seneca Hill is really impressive, and we are looking forward to working with them as they continue to provide the best veterinary care and resort services to the Great Falls community,” added Ryan Lindgren, VP of Business Development at CVP. “Seneca Hill is our 10th hospital in Virginia, and we hope to continue to add more hospitals like Seneca Hill from the state to our family in the near future.”

 

From clinical care to resort services, Seneca Hill offers clients a complete commitment to total pet indulgence. Veterinary services like surgery, dentistry, an in-house pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, ultrasound, electrocardiograms and senior care are rounded out with resort services such as day care, training, grooming, physical therapy and swimming in the Aquatic Center’s indoor pool. During peak periods, the resort accommodates over 100 dogs and cats and has been rated best in the D.C. Metro area by the veterinary community.

 

About Community Veterinary Partners

Community Veterinary Partners is a family of over 50 animal hospitals brought together to collaborate on the best way to deliver quality care to our patients and a first-rate experience for our clients. We are committed to investing in and partnering with leading hospitals, nurturing and developing the best people and providing support services that are paramount in our industry. Quality of care is always foremost and will forever remain at the hospital level with CVP. More information is available at www.cvpco.com.


Allentown Animal Hospital is CVP’s 20th Veterinary Hospital in Pennsylvania!

Community Veterinary Partners is thrilled to announce the addition of our newest hospital, Allentown Animal Clinic in Allentown, PA. The veterinary practice consists of four doctors and joins CVP as its 35th hospital overall, 20th in the state of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Judy Rutkowski, owner of Allentown Animal Clinic, received her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine in 1984 from Ohio State University after earning a B.S. in Biology at the University of Maryland. In addition to her post-graduate education, she completed a large animal surgical internship and residency in 1988 at the University of Pennsylvania’s prestigious New Bolton Center. “I chose to partner with CVP because I felt that it was the best option to gain external resources without changing the culture and philosophy of our hospital,” said Dr. Rutkowski. “I’m looking forward to partnering with other CVP sister practices to share success strategies and foster an internal network of knowledge.”

Allentown Animal Clinic serves its clients with the highest quality of patient care and treats each patient as if they were their own. Aside from custom wellness plans for all ages, they offer a variety of different services including advanced dental procedures, digital radiology and come equipped with a fully stocked pharmacy. The clinic also sees reptiles, birds, ferrets and small mammals. They offer specialty services and have helped hundreds of families in the Lehigh Valley with the difficult process of relocating their pets to Hawaii, Europe, South America and dozens of other countries and continents.

“Seeing how dedicated the team at Allentown Animal Clinic is not only to their patients but to their community is what gets us so elated to have them join the family!” says Lou Weihrauch, Vice President of Operation as Community Veterinary Partners. “Dr. Rutkowski and her team have worked diligently to get the reputation they have and we hope to only add to that. Their great location, wide variety of services and impeccable veterinary care is why they were the recipient of the 2017 YELP ‘People Who Love Us’ award. Being a staple in the community, Allentown Animal Clinic is a wonderful addition to the CVP family as we expand even further into Pennsylvania.”

 

Visit Allentown Animal Clinics website at https://aacexotics.com


Should Your Animal Hospital Offer House Calls and In-Home Veterinary Services?

House Calls Dr Plotnick Manhattan Cat Specialists

Written By: Brad Reiss, Practice Manager, Manhattan Cat Specialists

Many veterinary hospitals do not offer house-calls or in-home veterinary services and wonder whether or not it is the right choice for their practice. Manhattan Cat Specialists, a CVP Partner Hospital, offers house calls. Owner, Arnold Plotnick, MS, DVM, ACVIM, a veterinarian & feline expert for over 30 years, believes there a number of reasons for offering house calls:

  • Some cats get so nervous on the trip to the vet that they urinate, defecate, or vomit (or all three!) in their carrier on the way to (or from) the office.
  • Some cats who are normally very well-behaved at home become very agitated and aggressive once they enter the veterinary office.
  • Some cats, with their sixth sense, know that a veterinary visit is imminent, and they hide under the bed or the couch, making their capture and transport to the office an ordeal for the client.
  • Many of clients have multiple cats, and bringing two, or three, or five (or seven…) cats to the office becomes a logistical nightmare.
  • As our feline population ages, clients are aging right along with them, and some elderly clients find it increasingly difficult to bring their cat to the office.
  • Many owners would like their terminally ill cats to be euthanized in their own home when the time comes.

For these reasons, Manhattan Cat Specialists decided to provide house calls and in-home veterinary services in order to meet the needs of their clients.

When a client makes an appointment for a house call, Dr. Plotnick and a veterinary technician visit the home with the necessary equipment and medical supplies in order to duplicate the type of visit the cat would receive at the hospital.  This includes a complete physical examination, blood and urine collection for lab analysis if necessary, vaccinations, microchipping, feline leukemia and FIV testing, blood typing, subcutaneous fluid administration, ear cleaning, claw trimming, blood pressure measurement, application of Soft Paws, and many other procedures.

And of course, when the time is appropriate, euthanasia can be performed in a gentle, compassionate manner at home. Manhattan Cats will also take care of the cremation arrangements.

It’s important to let clients know which home procedures cannot be performed in the home, for example, x-rays and surgery.  After the examination, if it is determined that a cat needs these or other advanced diagnostic procedures, or needs to be admitted to the hospital, transportation for the cat to the hospital will be arranged. Life threatening emergencies cannot wait, and should not be scheduled for house calls.  Cats who are having difficulty breathing, are having seizures, are unconscious, or are bleeding uncontrollably should be brought to the practice immediately, or to an emergency hospital if it is after hours.

To know whether offering house calls is right for your veterinary hospital, it’s a good idea to survey clients. Those with multiple or difficult pets may be the top clients to take advantage of this service. Especially if no other animal hospitals are doing house calls in the area, you may increase your client base as well as current pet visits.

To learn more about Manhattan Cat Specialists visit their website HERE.


Vet considers retiring rather than comply with regulators | Read this week's CVP Animal News Roundup

Vet considers retiring rather than comply with regulators

An Indiana veterinarian is contemplating retirement rather than agreeing to make certain improvements required by state regulators, according to a story in the Martinsville Reporter-Times.

“I’d like to continue practicing, but it is going to take a miracle to keep my license,” he said in a letter to clients. “I don’t feel I can conform to their request… there is a lot in the settlement that I don’t feel right about.”

The state dropped similar charges in 2010.

Dr. James Brester’s clinic is popular — he has more than 13,000 fans on a Facebook page dedicated to supporting him.

Should the state be able to decide whether he can practice medicine?

Michael

More Veterinary Industry News

Medical Advancement
Stem cell treatment proves promising in dogs with Crohn’s-like disease

Massachusetts-based Ocata Therapeutics may have found a way to knock the disease into remission in dogs: with stem cells.

Read the full story at Fierce Animal

Leadership
AKC Appoints Head Veterinarian

Dr. Jerry Klein brings with him over 35 years of experience in the Veterinary field. Currently, he is the Supervising Veterinarian at the Chicago Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Center.

Read the full press release

Veterinary School

For Veterinary Students the Hardest Lessons of All is Saying Goodbye

Euthanasia is one of the most common procedures veterinarians perform, and some individual doctors put more than 100 of their patients to death each year. Experts say that can exact an indelible psychological toll. And now college programs training future veterinarians are paying special attention to the emotional aspects of death.

Read the full story at the Washington Post

Lyme Disease in the News

Research: Lyme disease subverts immune system, prevents protection

Ninety-five percent of dogs exposed to Lyme disease do not have symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). And according to a recent study, their immune systems may be tricked into not launching a full-blown response or developing lasting immunity to the disease.

Read the news story at AAHA
Read the research at PLOS`

Forum: Lyme disease a continual issue in dogs, and humans

Lyme disease is diagnosed more readily and responded to differently in animal health compared to human health. Two veterinarians and two experts on tick-borne disease in people spoke on Sept. 10 at an unusual forum in Syracuse, N.Y. It was unusual because it is rare for medical professionals on the animal and human side to share information on the same stage.

Read the full story at The Chicago Tribune

Entertainment
Veterinary documentary featured at film festivals

What began as a graduate student’s film project has blossomed into a critically acclaimed documentary about a larger-than-life veterinarian in pursuit of his passions: animal health and community outreach. New York Vet follows Long Island veterinarian Dr. John Charos throughout his daily life operating a chain of practices and volunteering to prevent animal abuse.

Read the story at VIN
Watch the trailer


CVP Member Network Veterinary Hospitals Show Positive Revenue Growth In Q2

Each fiscal quarter, CVP Member Network hospitals share their financial results with us. We ask them to do this so we can compile a benchmarking report. This report enables us to see how the CVP Member Network hospitals are doing in relation to their peers. These results are also a great way to see how your veterinary hospital is performing in relation to other practices.

In the second quarter of 2015, our Member Network hospitals continued to show positive revenue growth over Q2 in 2014. Of the 29 hospitals in our Member Network, 25 or 86% reported growth in 2015 over 2014! The average change in revenue that was reported was 8% extending above average growth patterns for a second consecutive reporting period.

Q2 revenue comparison


Join Us For Our 2015 Fall Meeting!

You’re Invited To Our 2015 Fall Meeting!

Overcoming Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

Please join CVP, Ceva Animal Health and The Calico Group for an entertaining and enlightening day on the impact of behavior on our day-to-day practice lives.  In what promises to be outstanding event, we’ll review and discuss the importance of the many interactions between all parties in the doctor-patient-client relationship. The day will be a unique mix of clinical, practical, and management concepts and provide attendees pragmatic ideas for tackling common problems.

In addition to a fantastic line up of speakers and topics, enjoy the day in one of the most unique venues in our area, meet some of the staff of the Elmwood Park Zoo and get a one-of-a kind view of one of the area’s most popular family attractions

Event Details:

Sunday, September 20th, 2015
9 am to 3:30 PM

Elmwood Park Zoo
Canopy Gardens Hall
1661 Harding Blvd
Norristown, PA 19401

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Please RSVP to your local Ceva Territory Manager or to Dr. Travis Meredith at travis.meredith@cvpco.com.


Join Us At Our Spring Meeting! Overcoming Veterinary Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

You’re Invited To Our 2015 Spring Meeting!

Overcoming Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

Please join CVP, Ceva Animal Health and The Calico Group for an entertaining and enlightening day on the impact of behavior on our day-to-day practice lives.  In what promises to be outstanding event, we’ll review and discuss the importance of the many interactions between all parties in the doctor-patient-client relationship. The day will be a unique mix of clinical, practical, and management concepts and provide attendees pragmatic ideas for tackling common problems.

In addition to a fantastic line up of speakers and topics, enjoy the day in one of the most unique venues in our area, meet some of the staff of the Elmwood Park Zoo and get a one-of-a kind view of one of the area’s most popular family attractions

Event Details:

Sunday, May 17th, 2015
9 am to 3:30 PM

Elmwood Park Zoo
Canopy Gardens Hall
1661 Harding Blvd
Norristown, PA 19401

ce event

Please RSVP to your local Ceva Territory Manager or to Dr. Travis Meredith at travis.meredith@cvpco.com


10 Tips For Creating A Happy Workplace At Your Animal Hospital: Part 2

workplace zen

By Dennis McMichael, Practice Manager — Animal Hospital of Dauphin County

Previously, I took you through my first top 5 tips for a happy workplace. Here are my remaining top factors that I consider to be the most impactful in cracking open your workplace Zen (as a team). 

6. Set Goals (as a team): In professional sports a team’s shared goals are apparent and understood.  Moreover, the teams’ success towards those goals is blatantly, and sometimes brutally obvious (Go Phillies! Go Eagles!).  In the common workplace neither of these statements holds true; however, each member of the team plays just as much of a role in achieving the team’s shared goals.  As such the team’s involvement in understanding challenges, creating shared goals, monitoring progress, and managing their shared goals to success is paramount in fostering happiness and success.  Beyond that the involvement of fresh minds in the process will lead to new ideas and the discovery of untapped talents.

7. Create Happy Customers (as a team): The customer is always right because if the customer is wrong, your competition is happy to make it right!   Too often a disconnect occurs in considering customers as the primary resource for achieving success toward the team’s shared goals.  By assuming the role of a customer advocate, team members align and accomplish the customer’s goals, the team’s goals, and their individual goals while creating happy customers in the process.  And the happiest teams are teams working with happy customers!

8. Make It Personal (as a team): When was the last time you stopped a staff meeting and played a fun, interactive game? The gains realized are well worth the small amount of time sacrificed from the team’s everyday routine.  Team members connecting on a personal level greatly increases the probability of greater cohesiveness at the professional level.  Additionally, a little bit of camaraderie goes a long way in strengthening staff retention and creating more natural and enjoyable customer interactions.   At times, the most effective thing a team leader can do is create an opportunity for the team to interact freely without the constraints and distractions of the job obstructing the team’s ability to develop their relationships and identity.

9. Recognize Contributions (as a team): Teams and their individual members contribute their talents every day; however, only the largest accomplishments are consistently celebrated with any sort of fanfare.  “Great job making that copy, Mary!” and “You really nailed sweeping that floor, Joe!” are examples of praises very rarely uttered in the workplace.  But why not?  There is absolutely nothing wrong with recognizing another team member’s contributions to the overall success of the team’s shared goals.  In fact, offering such praise will play a crucial role in creating a happy team and an environment conducive to productive communication.

10. Love What You Do (as a team): On average we spend 45% of our waking hours at work or performing work-related functions.  That is way too much time to not derive some enjoyment from our jobs and our teams.  It is always a useful exercise for each team member to reflect on their position and identify the functions, responsibilities, and accomplishments that make them most content in their role.  Likewise, it is just as worthwhile to examine the less enjoyable tasks and look for ways to make them more enticing for the team member.  Even if the end result is the same, the exercise itself will help increase contentedness with the individual.  In the end, when we love what we do it shows.  And the effects are contagious to team members and customers alike!

A happy workplace requires an appropriate mix of all the ingredients to get it just right.  Similarly, different teams will have different mixes for what’s right for them; however, the ingredients will all still be there.  And the best part is that once your mix is established the workplace will become a lot of fun!


10 Tips for Creating a Happy Workplace At Your Animal Hospital: Part 1

happy workplace

By Dennis McMichael, Practice Manager — Animal Hospital of Dauphin County

Throughout my youth and professional career I’ve had the pleasure of serving on and leading many teams with a variety of purposes and goals.  In each instance a number of consistent factors contributed to each team’s success, failure, and, ultimately, happiness.  And in each instance the team’s happiness could be directly attributed to our performance and application of those factors as a team.  While it would be nearly impossible to list all of the factors contributing to a happy team and workplace, the following list captures the top factors that I consider to be the most consistently impactful in cracking open your workplace Zen (as a team).

1. Be Humble (as a team): We all have faults.  The sooner we are able to acknowledge and accept this fact, the sooner we move past reactive and guarded habits and progress towards becoming proactive producers.  Some of the best people to have on your team are the ones who ask a lot of questions and force the team to rethink what they thought they already knew.  Leaders are no exception to this trait — as a matter of fact, leaders stand to gain even more from their own humbleness by forging important relationships and better understanding the resources available to them.

2. Communicate (as a team): Every success and failure begins and ends with productive communication or a lack thereof.  It is as simple as that, yet, we continually fall into the traps created by lack of communication or even unproductive communication.  A successful and happy team’s habitual response to unexpected adversity is productive communication.  This often takes the form of a 5 minute “huddle” to discuss the issue at hand, identify resources and possible solutions, and plot the path to success.  As humans contentedness is equivalent to happiness.  Internalized stress is commonly one of the largest barriers to contentedness.  The habitual response of productive communication and group problem solving eliminates this barrier before it even has a chance to take shape.

3. Create a Culture of Solutions (as a team): How much of your team’s time is lost to idle complaints?  Beyond time, what is the impact of idle complaining on individual and team morale?  Many people complain simply because it requires less effort than solving the problem in the first place; however, this is where the power of the team really comes to life.  If the team publicly recognizes their distaste for idle complaining, the team can successfully outlaw the behavior from the workplace and replace it with an expectation of productive communication.  Much like Planet Fitness’ “Lunk Alarm” combats “gymtimidation”, a staff unified towards productive communication is empowered to recognize and refuse idle complaining in a more comfortable manner that encourages productive solutions and a happy workplace.

4. Celebrate Your Successes (as a team): The ever-increasing demand for efficiency is at odds with the need for workplace happiness.  How many times have you thought “That was really a great accomplishment and it needs to be recognized when time allows.”?  Did you do it?  Did you do it publicly?  Celebrating successes boosts morale while providing a positive reinforcement of the team’s shared goals.  Additionally, creating a ‘shout out’-friendly environment can do wonders in promoting individual and team senses of self-worth.  These gestures are a catalyst for kindness.  No, the team doesn’t need to spend the entire day patting each other on the back.  Staff meetings, internal newsletters, group emails, suggestion boxes, bulletin boards, etc. can all serve as appropriate forums to share the love!

5. Own Your Mistakes (as a team): So you made a mistake — now what?  Human nature and tradition seem to tell us to shy away and let someone else fix it but where’s the growth in that?  Recognize the opportunity and turn the situation on its head.  The team and/or team member stand to gain valuable knowledge and insight by assessing the situation and envisioning a reasonable solution.  Furthermore, what could have been a confidence-draining experience can — if handled properly — become a confidence-building morale booster.  Finally, is there a lesson learned that can be used to benefit team members not specifically involved with this opportunity?  Make sure that teachable moment is appropriately shared and utilized!

Check back for Part 2 and my remaining 5 tips for a happy workplace!


Measuring Performance At Your Veterinary Hospital-Recognizing Trends And Avoiding Potential Problems

278541-20150218

Written By: Travis Meredith DVM, MBA, DIP. ACT- Community Veterinary Partners; Director of Member Services

In spending time with many successful practice owners, I always find it interesting to learn how each tracks the performance of his or her veterinary hospital. Some veterinary practice owners have a very sales oriented approach to tracking current and future success while others feel that they are able to trust their gut by looking at the volume in their waiting room. One thing I realized is that there is no one metric that everyone follows to measure practice performance.

How is it possible that various successful veterinary practices I know can be so successful yet track their performance so differently? In my opinion, the answer lies in looking and listening to your practice’s performance and the frequency that the “diagnostics” are run.

I was given the opportunity to leave hospital ownership to run a business unit for a major animal health company where I was mentored by one of the biggest data nerds I’ve ever met. Each morning he made it a habit to do a 30-minute review of the previous day so he always knew what parts of the business were going well, what areas were in trouble, and where potential problems may arise. In doing this, he was able to focus his energy on potential problems before they became actual problems. In following just a few key metrics each day, he taught me how to stay ahead of potential problems that may arise.

When I returned to managing veterinary hospitals, I took the simple tricks I learned with me.  In looking at each practice type, I made sure to check for a few key metrics and just like the veterinary practice owners who run leading indicators or who reads the volume in the hospital waiting room; I followed those metrics every day.  Over time, this gave me the ability to gain a true pulse of each practice.  I was able to identified negative trends sooner, understand staffing issues more clearly, and be proactive to avoid potential problems and do things that make the practice more valuable.

Something to think about after reading this. Every morning when you arrive at your veterinary hospital you usually spend time evaluating each client and pet that is in the waiting room.  It’s important to show the same dedication to your business each day by taking 20 to 30 minutes to follow the key metrics for your practice.