Stop By Booth #125 At ACVC This Week!

Will you be attending the Atlantic Coast Veterinary Conference this week? If so, stop by and see us at booth #125 to chat with someone from Community Veterinary Partners. Also, you can enter to win a FREE iPad! We’ll see you there!


CVP Member Network Veterinary Hospitals Show Positive Revenue Growth In Q2

Each fiscal quarter, CVP Member Network hospitals share their financial results with us. We ask them to do this so we can compile a benchmarking report. This report enables us to see how the CVP Member Network hospitals are doing in relation to their peers. These results are also a great way to see how your veterinary hospital is performing in relation to other practices.

In the second quarter of 2015, our Member Network hospitals continued to show positive revenue growth over Q2 in 2014. Of the 29 hospitals in our Member Network, 25 or 86% reported growth in 2015 over 2014! The average change in revenue that was reported was 8% extending above average growth patterns for a second consecutive reporting period.

Q2 revenue comparison


Community Veterinary Partners Welcomes Ardmore Animal Hospital To Our Family!

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Ardmore Animal Hospital has joined the CVP family of veterinary hospitals! Ardmore Animal Hospital has won “Best of the Main Line” for 15 years in a row. The hospital provides several professional services including wellness care, ultrasounds, digital radiology, and laser surgery. The hospital has also recently received a Silver Certificate in recognition of implementing cat-friendly practice standards according to the American Association of Feline Practitioners.

The staff of doctors includes partner doctor, Dr. James Bianco, Dr. James Peters, Dr. Lena Montgomery, Dr. Janine Haney, and Dr. Aliya McCullough.Dr. Meghan McCartin who will be joining the team in October.

Michael Raphael, Chairman of Community Veterinary Partners, is especially excited for Ardmore Animal Hospital to join the CVP family: “Ardmore Animal Hospital holds a special place for me,” he said. “Not only is it one of the premier hospitals in the Philadelphia community, it’s also where my family took our dog when I was a kid. Dr. Bianco cared for Patches with such enthusiasm and affection. It’s stayed with me to this day. So the idea of becoming Dr. Bianco’s business partner is all that more special.”

Dr. Bianco has owned and operated Ardmore Animal Hospital since 1989. He is a 1987 graduate of the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Veterinary Medicine. Before attending veterinary school, he earned a master’s degree from Villanova University and also taught high school biology and advanced placement science courses for seven years. His interests in medicine include soft tissue surgery, internal medicine, and alternative modalities such as vitamin therapy, nutritional healing, and herbal medicine. He has done several segments for local TV networks. Dr. Bianco’s goal has always been to assemble the most qualified staff and practice the highest quality medicine for animals. The tremendous growth of Ardmore Animal Hospital has resulted in this facility being able to provide its patients with the best care possible.

Dr. Bianco is very excited to be partnering with Community Veterinary Partners.

“It was a smooth transition and everything was well organized,” he said. “There were no significant changes to the staff and management or the quality of medicine and the change has been virtually invisible to the clientele.”

Welcome to the CVP Family Ardmore Animal Hospital!


Join Us For Our 2015 Fall Meeting!

You’re Invited To Our 2015 Fall Meeting!

Overcoming Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

Please join CVP, Ceva Animal Health and The Calico Group for an entertaining and enlightening day on the impact of behavior on our day-to-day practice lives.  In what promises to be outstanding event, we’ll review and discuss the importance of the many interactions between all parties in the doctor-patient-client relationship. The day will be a unique mix of clinical, practical, and management concepts and provide attendees pragmatic ideas for tackling common problems.

In addition to a fantastic line up of speakers and topics, enjoy the day in one of the most unique venues in our area, meet some of the staff of the Elmwood Park Zoo and get a one-of-a kind view of one of the area’s most popular family attractions

Event Details:

Sunday, September 20th, 2015
9 am to 3:30 PM

Elmwood Park Zoo
Canopy Gardens Hall
1661 Harding Blvd
Norristown, PA 19401

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Please RSVP to your local Ceva Territory Manager or to Dr. Travis Meredith at travis.meredith@cvpco.com.


The first CVP Weekly – A roundup of the latest small animal news

 

Welcome to the very first issue of CVP Weekly — a weekly roundup of the latest news from the small animal veterinary industry. Every week, we compile a rundown of the most important and vital news in the business and deliver it directly to your inbox. We don’t just cut and paste press releases. Instead, we search for real stories that directly impact your daily work life. You can expect to dig into national reports, information on regulatory issues, news on general animal health, examinations of new products and ideas in practice management.

What do you think of our inaugural issue? Email me at michael.raphael@cvpco.com.

If you’ve been forwarded this edition, you can subscribe here.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it in your browser.

Michael

The Top Story
Industry News

AVMA delegates reject changes to veterinary school accreditation process

At the annual meeting of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) House of Delegates in July, the house voted against four resolutions related to the accreditation of veterinary schools by the AVMA Council on Education (COE).

Read the full story from DVM360.

Read the full story from VIN.

More News
Your Clients are Reading This

Why vets are getting away with murder

The veterinary profession is broken and it isn’t about to change any time soon. Our pets are being over-serviced and we’re getting fleeced. We pay for the unnecessary vaccinations, the overly-processed, synthetic prescription pet foods that contain ingredients from China, and we pay for drugs and chemicals that are damaging to the immune system.

Read the full story from Dogs Naturally

Hot Topic

What to do about ShotVet?

Many in the veterinary community are asking what can be done to stop the low-cost mobile veterinary vaccine service associated with Walgreens drug stores. The answer may be nothing.

Read the full story from DVM360.

Practice Management

Should you buy that latest, greatest piece of veterinary equipment?

Many factors are essential to the practice of quality medicine and surgery; including an appropriate range of high-quality equipment for both diagnostics and treatment.

Read the full story by Dr. Karen Felsted.

Veterinary Schools

Foundation donates $100,000 for Penn Vet scholarships

The University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine said the Thoroughbred Education and Research Foundation, or TERF, will donate $100,000 to create an endowment for student scholarships.

Read the full story from the Daily Local News.

People

Texas A&M veterinarian to lead AAVMC

Dr. Eleanor Green, the Carl B. King Dean of Veterinary Medicine at the Texas A&M University College July 24, of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, has begun her term as president of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC).

Read the full story from Bovine Vet Online

Opinion

Dr. Robert Marshak: Long live the veterinary teaching hospital

The proliferation of veterinary colleges with limited or no research base, existing outside of a community of scholars, and pursuing a distributive model of clinical education, not only undermines the fabric of American veterinary medical education but also the economic status and future of the profession.

Read the full story from VIN.

Regulatory

FDA takes steps to prevent sales of unapproved kidney drugs for dogs and cats

The United States District Court for the District of Nevada entered a consent decree of permanent injunction against Bio Health Solutions LLC, of Las Vegas and its manager and co-owner, Mark Garrison, for selling RenAvast, an unapproved animal drug.

Read the full story from the FDA

Regulatory

Four Multistate Outbreaks of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks

CDC, public health, veterinary, and agriculture officials in many states and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) are investigating four multistate outbreaks of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with live poultry.

Read the full story from the CDC.

And there’s this

41-pound cat loses over half its weight

A former 41-pound cat dubbed Skinny has lost more than half of his weight to become the darling of a Dallas veterinary clinic.

Read the full story from the NY Post

Community Veterinary Partners works with veterinarian owners who want to continue running the medical side of their practices, but want help with the day-to-day administrative and team management tasks. We help create a long-term strategy and a sustainable way for your practice to continue thriving — well into the future. Contact us to learn about how to partner with CVP and secure your financial future and the legacy of your hospital.

Copyright © 2015 Community Veterinary Partners, All rights reserved.

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CVP Partner Hospital Connects With NY Community By Providing Veterinary Care for Government Agency Dogs

Written By: Brian Miller, Receptionist and Social Media Specialist, Liverpool Animal Health Center

Sargent Cicora & Devitt
Sargent Cicora & Devitt
McGinn & Devitt
McGinn & Devitt

Another unique group of patients we treat at Liverpool Animal Health Center are government agency dogs.  The New York State Police, United States Border Patrol and the City of Oswego bring some of their K9 officers in to be treated by our doctors.  This relationship was not designated by the agencies themselves, but rather, by the individual handlers.  According to Dr. David Clegg, the first K9 officer we treated was owned by a trooper whose other dog was already a patient with us.  The doctors were immediately impressed by the bond shared between the partners.  This particular K9 officer eventually needed to have his spleen removed, and his handler was very happy with the end result.  Through him, word began to spread about our practice, and we began to see more of these four-legged officers.  Dr. Clegg says that “Each handler we see here is great.  They love their dogs and will do whatever they can to follow our recommendations.”

One of the officers who began bringing his animals to LAHC was New York State Trooper Jeff Cicora who has been stationed in Central New York for over 20 years, and was chosen to become a K9 handler in 2001.  He and his wife began coming to our practice in 2005.  At the time, they owned a cocker spaniel, and Officer Cicora’s partner, “Devitt.”  Sgt. Cicora says that they had tried other local offices, but “When we finally tried LAHC we were pleasantly surprised at the friendly service provided by the staff and doctors.  If it was really busy, the awesome receptionists (Patti, Robbi, and Brian) would find a way to fit us in.  They went above and beyond to help us with our veterinary needs.  When we got in to see the doctors we were treated with respect and given medical information in a way that we could easily understand.  In all the years that I have been going to LAHC with my K9 partners, I have never questioned their ability to give my dogs the very best care available!”

When it came to Devitt, as well as treating Sgt. Cicora’s next partner “McGinn” and all of the other officers that came through our doors, Dr. Clegg states that the doctors have to be aware that the animals are working dogs and need to be able to perform their job.  “They are no different than a service dog for someone who is deaf or blind.  Being able to work is part of their life, and we need to acknowledge that the dog cannot simply stay home and lay on the couch for two weeks.”  This type of care was not lost on Sgt. Cicora.  “We were always treated like family and if Devitt or McGinn ever had a medical problem the staff and doctors at LAHC took immediate action and treated the problem,” says Cicora.   “We certainly didn’t request or demand special treatment but the doctors always seemed to take a special interest in us.  They seemed to know the importance of the job and duties that we performed on a daily basis and did everything they could to make Devitt and McGinn comfortable and get them back into service as soon as possible.”  He goes on to say, “Our K9 partners’ health is very important and you should always feel comfortable in knowing that your dog is getting the best treatment available.  You should be able to trust your vet just as much as you trust your dog.  Police work is inherently dangerous and you must be able to trust that your vet is trained and prepared for the worst case scenario if your dog goes down.”  Sgt. Cicora finishes with a statement that is not only a wonderful compliment, but succinctly summarizes the feelings we yearn for all of our clients to have.  “We have found ourselves in the office quite frequently over the years for a myriad of reasons and built a great rapport with the staff and doctors. If I ever had leave either of my partners, I knew they would be well taken care.  I trusted that the doctors and animal caretakers would protect them like I protected them. I never had any reservation about their care.  I am proud to say that I consider the staff at LAHC to be a part of our family.”

At Liverpool Animal Health Center, we not only strive to exceed our client’s expectations, but to set ourselves apart from our many competitors.  By defying convention and providing some of the aforementioned services that others do not, we continue to prove why our hospital is the premiere destination for animal care in Central New York.


CVP Welcomes Manhattan Cat Specialists to Their Family of Partners Hospitals

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Community Veterinary Partners is proud to announce a new partnership with Manhattan Cat Specialists and Arnold Plotnick, DVM, MS, ACVIM.  Located in New York City’s Upper West Side, Manhattan Cat Specialists is CVP’s first feline-only veterinary partnership.  “At CVP we are extremely excited to partner with Manhattan Cat Specialists and Dr. Plotnick” Says Scott Kirker, Vice President of Finance. “Their level of service and devotion to the cats of New York City is truly one of a kind, and we can’t wait to see what the future holds for our partnership.”

Dr. Arnold Plotnick received his veterinary degree from the University of Florida in 1988 and then completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Pennsylvania.  He worked as an associate veterinarian at the Cat Hospital at Towson in Md., and then returned to academia and completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at Colorado State University.  Dr. Plotnick became board certified in internal medicine in 1997.  He served as chief of staff of VetSmart Pet Hospital in Columbia, Md., before returning to his home town of New York City to become vice president of Animal Health at The ASPCA.

Dr. Plotnick is also a well-known writer. He authored CatFancy’s “Ask the Veterinarian” column for many years and is a frequent contributor to Catnip magazine. He is a co-author of The Original CatFancy Cat Bible, and is the current author of “Body Parts” in Catster magazine. He is also the writer of the popular blog “Cat Man Do.” Dr. Plotnick is extremely passionate about veterinary medicine as well as New York, “After the tragic events of September 11, 2001, I was inspired to play a part in the renewal of New York by founding Manhattan Cat Specialists in January 2003.” Says Dr. Plotnick, “I have devoted myself solely to feline medicine since then, and Manhattan Cat Specialists has blossomed into the premier feline-only veterinary practice in New York City.  I am proud to move forward with Community Veterinary Partners.”

About Community Veterinary Partners
Community Veterinary Partners invests with veterinarian owners who want to continue running the medical side of their practice, but want help with the day-to-day administrative and team management tasks. CVP currently has 14 partner hospitals in its family. Find more information about Community Veterinary Partners and its family of veterinary hospitals at www.cvpco.com  


Join Us At Our Spring Meeting! Overcoming Veterinary Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

You’re Invited To Our 2015 Spring Meeting!

Overcoming Behavior Obstacles in Our Patients, Our People, and Our Practices

Please join CVP, Ceva Animal Health and The Calico Group for an entertaining and enlightening day on the impact of behavior on our day-to-day practice lives.  In what promises to be outstanding event, we’ll review and discuss the importance of the many interactions between all parties in the doctor-patient-client relationship. The day will be a unique mix of clinical, practical, and management concepts and provide attendees pragmatic ideas for tackling common problems.

In addition to a fantastic line up of speakers and topics, enjoy the day in one of the most unique venues in our area, meet some of the staff of the Elmwood Park Zoo and get a one-of-a kind view of one of the area’s most popular family attractions

Event Details:

Sunday, May 17th, 2015
9 am to 3:30 PM

Elmwood Park Zoo
Canopy Gardens Hall
1661 Harding Blvd
Norristown, PA 19401

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Please RSVP to your local Ceva Territory Manager or to Dr. Travis Meredith at travis.meredith@cvpco.com


Implementing Veterinary Acupuncture in General Practice

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Written By: Emily L. Elliot VMD. Chippens Hill Veterinary Hospital

While a veterinarian is learning veterinary acupuncture, offering treatments to pets belonging to staff members gives both the veterinarian and the staff member confidence in the treatment and the results.  Once certified, the clinician offers treatment to clients’ pets, and it is easy for the staff members and colleagues to endorse the modality they have seen achieve results.  In the typical case load of general practice, there is ample opportunity to treat epileptics and geriatric pets with degenerative joint disease, for example, in conjunction with medication and nutritional supplements.  Acupuncture is particularly beneficial for animals who have impaired hepatic and renal function for metabolizing medication, since acupuncture gives them pain relief that allows the owner to give fewer drugs.

Typically, animals come to the clinic weekly for initial treatments, which are later scheduled less often once the animal is stable.  Typical chronic conditions need a monthly maintenance treatment, which allows practical monitoring of the animal’s weight, body condition, and blood work.  The other benefit of acupuncture in general practice is the opportunity to communicate with the client.  While the animal’s acupuncture needles are in place for 10-20 minutes, the veterinarian and the technician have time to educate the client in disease management, and give the client tremendous confidence in the care and concern the office has for customizing the care of the individual animal.

Acupuncture further maximizes the veterinarian’s time, since once the clinician gets a progress report, evaluates the patient, and places the needles with the technician holding the animal and talking with the owner, the veterinarian can move on to another exam room to see another patient, returning to the acupuncture patient in 10-20 minutes to remove the needles and schedule the next visit.  Record keeping for acupuncture is straightforward, and fees can vary with demographics but should reflect the investment in time and training required to learn the skill, and the time of the technician assisting with the treatment.  Once skilled, veterinarians can reach out to individual colleagues or present talks at local veterinary associations to explain the benefits of acupuncture for referral cases.  Establish a consultation fee for referred clients at their first visit in addition to the fee for acupuncture.  Of course, respect for the referral relationship gives colleagues trust so that they continue to send cases for acupuncture treatment.

In the third installment in this series, I will compare acupuncture and laser therapy.

Emily L. Elliot, VMD


The Top 8 Things Your Veterinary Practice Must Do To Thrive In The Future

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Written By: Karen Felsted, CPA, MS, DVM, CVPM

It’s a new world out there in veterinary medicine and the things that were enough to guarantee practice success twenty years ago aren’t the same now.  While there are many things practices need to focus on, the following are some of the most important.

1: Practice Good Quality Medicine

This one goes without saying but, unfortunately, it’s often not enough to insure practice success. Unless you amputate the wrong leg, clients can’t judge the quality of the medicine you practice. They judge veterinary hospitals by things they can understand-generally communication and client service. You can be the best doctor in the state, but if clients don’t feel they got value for the dollars spent in a way they understand, they won’t come back. 

2: Back to Basics

Wowing clients is great but it’s more important to make sure their basic needs are met.  If the owner of an itchy dog comes to a practice, is 45 minutes late being seen, doesn’t understand what the doctor is saying is the cause of the itching, and doesn’t get the promised call back the next day, sending the dog home with a cute bandana won’t make up for it.

3: Know What Your Clients Want

There’s lots of information out there about “what clients want.”  Much of it is very valid and applies to most clients of most practices.  But it’s critical that you regularly gather information about what YOUR clients want and how happy they are with your practice.    The best way to do this is to regularly ask clients about their experience with your practice via regular client surveys.  However, you can also gather this vital information by:  welcoming client complaints and making things right, reviewing record transfers and tracking client complaints to identify any patterns and whether or not changes in the practice are reducing the complaints.

4: Offer Payment Options

 The price of veterinary care continues to be an issue for many pet owners.  They want to provide the best care but are struggling with many demands on their money.  We know that payment options make a difference—multiple studies have shown that clients who have pet insurance or a third party veterinary credit card or are enrolled in a wellness plan visit the veterinary practice more frequently and spend more money on veterinary services.  Understanding the options yourself and educating clients makes a big difference in how pet owners take care of their pets and how well your practice does.

5: Don’t Shoot Yourself in the Foot

 Look at your practice from the client’s perspective.  When you discourage a client from visiting their pet during its two night stay at your practice, how does the client feel?  The pet owner knows that when their human family members are in the hospital, it’s a different story—they can visit regularly.  They want to do the same with their furry family members—they want to be able to see that their pet is being well-taken care of and they want to reassure their pet that he/she hasn’t been abandoned.  What do you think my cousin thought when she picked up her cat following surgery and the technician said:  “We gave him some food this morning but he wouldn’t eat.  It might be because of the e-collar. Take that off when he gets home and see if that makes a difference?”  What she thought was:  “I just spent $3000 at this place and they’re starving my cat!”

6: Give Clients the Information They Want

A recent study looked at the top 5 health topics pet owners wanted to talk to their veterinarians about and the top 5 health topics veterinarians wanted to talk to pet owners about—only 1 topic was the same on both lists!  This doesn’t mean that the practice team should ignore the issues they think are important when talking with clients but it does mean they need to make sure client questions and concerns are addressed as well.  The simplest way to do this is to ASK: ·        

– Is there anything else going on with Fluffy that we haven’t covered?

– Is there anything else going on with Fluffy that we haven’t covered?

– Did you have any questions about what we have discussed?

– Do you have any other concerns?

– Are there any other questions you have?

– Can I do anything else for you?

7: Make Clear Recommendations

If you say:  “At some point you might want to get this dental done,”  the client’s not going to do it—a dental just doesn’t sound like something truly important to the health of the pet.  But if you say:  “Fluffy needs a to have her teeth cleaned and polished” or “I recommend that Fluffy have her teeth cleaned and polished” or “It is critical that Fluffy have her teeth cleaned and polished”, then the pet owner will pay attention.  The specific words are less important than the clarity of the statement you make.  According to one study, pet owners are 7 times more likely to follow their veterinarians’ recommendation when it is clear and unambiguous.

8: Get Help When You Need It

Veterinarians are great at practicing medicine; they are usually not great at preparing tax returns, writing legal documents or investing for retirement.  We advise our clients to see a specialist when it’s warranted; we should do the same.  There are many attorneys, CPAs, consultants, financial planners, lenders, architects, brokers and business appraisers who work exclusively with veterinary practices and veterinarians and can help you achieve the success you are looking for.